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 Immune system and skin cancer
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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 05/16/2007 :  12:16:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know there have been a couple of posts elsewhere regarding the immune system and its relationship to skin cancer. I have been researching this a little because I had my gut thoughts about this issue as well. I rarely get sick other than a basic cold and wanted to see if I could get some medical research views on the subject. Like most issues, I found some conflicting reports. Following is what I have learned and some links to interesting articles.

First, those of us that have skin cancer issues appear to be at a lower risk for getting other types of cancers. I guess that is a silver lining to the cloud we have about us. The theorized reasoning for the lower incidences of other internal cancers is, paradoxically, vitamin D due to sun exposure. There is a growing consensus that deficiency in vitamin D plays a role in cancer development. Vitamin D is produced by the skin with sun exposure. So, it appears that going outside for 15-20 minutes in an uncovered state is healthy, even for those of us with skin issues. After the short exposure though, we need coverage.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17208438

Next, there is a good deal of research that says exposure to UV-B is an immune suppressor.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?itool=abstractplus&db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=11861222

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17443748&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

The question then becomes, how do we mitigate the damage we have already received? I wish I knew. Dietary supplements are one possibility. Skin resurfacing is another (IPL with ALA).

In the world of supplements, here are a few that I am taking that have shown a definite role as a chemopreventative for cancers in general. ECGC, the compound found in green tea appears to be one good answer for skin.

“…we have discussed the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies that define and support the photoprotective efficacy of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) against UV carcinogenesis. The oral administration of GTPs in drinking water or the topical application of EGCG prevents UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice…”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?itool=abstractplus&db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=17049833


Resveratrol is another good candidate. Beware if you buy the product though. Several are sold that have very little potency. The “good stuff” that has been independently lab tested for potency is fairly expensive.

“Resveratrol is known to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and to inhibit platelet aggregation and the growth of a variety of cancer cells. Its potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities have been demonstrated in all three stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression), in both chemically and UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice, as well as in various murine models of human cancers”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17306316&query_hl=13&itool=pubmed_docsum

Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is another good general antioxidant with chemopreventative indications. Read Bill Sardi’s website sometime for a lot of good referenced detail on supplements in general. Here is a good starting point for IP6.

http://www.knowledgeofhealth.com/report.asp?story=The%20IP6%20Rice%20Bran%20Cleanse&catagory=Chelation,%20IP6

Some others that I take are ginger root and turmeric, and a vitamin D supplement.

So, my bottom line on the immune system is, I am going to assume I need to do what I can to enhance my bodies natural immune defenses as best as I can. A better diet – more fruits and veggies, supplemental Omega-3 fatty acids (may be the best advice), and the above mentioned antioxidants/supplements. And, a “little bit” of sunlight on unprotected skin…just don’t tell the dermatology community that says slather sunscreen on every AM before you do anything else.

There is a lot more to learn on the topic, but that is all I can do for now.

dan

606 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2007 :  00:16:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good stuff, Rocco, with the new studies! Vitamin D seems to consistently be a winner. Our main natural source is sunlight, but with UV-B being an "immune suppressor", vitamin D supplements look pretty good. Still, I'm not sure the immune suppressor label applies to anything but the affected skin. People generally feel better after getting a little sunshine and that alone may boost the immune system.

There is a conflicting study at http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/280/10/910 that says non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is associated with increased total cancer mortality (men's relative risk [RR], 1.30; women's RR, 1.26). I don't know how to reconcile that with these studies.

I'm also doing many of the things you mention. I've been drinking green tea in place of coffee lately. I recently started with Walgreen's Resveratrol (red wine polyphenol extract). It costs about $10 a bottle but is often available at half price. I buy ginger root at Trader Joes. I take vitamin D. I grind flax seeds (omega 3) in yogurt for breakfast (Budwig diet). I also try to get a few minutes of sunlight when I can. I think together it makes a big difference.
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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2007 :  11:37:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan, I am in agreement with you that doing a lot of these little things (taking supplemnts, getting a "little" su, etc) may add up to something meaningful. Anything we can do to bolster immune system responses has to be good for overall health and hopefully for our skin health as well.

Here is another new study on immune system and skin cancer that is very interesting. BTW, I read your new post on cimetidine, it was very interesting as well.

"Immune System Dysfunction Pinpointed in Melanoma Cases
Finding may boost cancer vaccine efforts, researchers say

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. researchers say they've spotted a key immune system dysfunction in patients with melanoma skin cancer.

A team at Stanford University School of Medicine, in California, found that the immune cells in most melanoma patients fail to respond properly to a molecule called interferon, which normally activates the immune system. This failure to respond to interferon means that the immune cells don't fight off melanoma.

The findings, published in the May issue of the journal Public Library of Science-Medicine, could help in the development of new treatments for melanoma.

Melanoma will kill about 16 percent of the 47,700 people in the United States expected to be diagnosed with this form of skin cancer this year.

These findings help explain why a common melanoma treatment involving prolonged exposure to interferon sometimes helps melanoma patients, said senior author Dr. Peter Lee, associate professor of medicine.

"Doctors knew it worked in some people but didn't know why," Lee said in a prepared statement. This study suggests that prolonged interferon treatment may work by overcoming the immune system's inability to respond to interferon.

Previous research has found that cancer patients often have immune system problems, but, until now, scientists didn't know which genes or pathways were at the root of the trouble. Identification of this interferon response disruption may boost efforts to develop vaccines for different types of cancer, the Stanford researchers said.

"We think this is a dominant way that immune dysfunction occurs in people with cancer," Lee said."

http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=604444


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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 06/06/2007 :  23:13:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found an interesting new study about a certain type of white blood cell called a T-cell (or T-lymphocyte) that plays an important role in the immune system response to skin cancer. There are two main types of T-cells. One type has molecules called CD4 on its surface; these "helper" cells orchestrate the body's response to certain micro-organisms such as viruses. The other T-cells, which have a molecule called CD8, destroy cells that are infected and produce antiviral substances.

The impetus for the study is the fact that solid organ transplant recipients have a 60–250-fold increased likelihood of developing sunlight-induced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared with the general population. This increased risk is linked to the immunosuppressive drugs taken by these patients to modulate T cell function, thus preventing organ rejection.

To determine the importance of T cells in the development of cutaneous (skin) SCC, the study examined the effects of selectively depleting mice of systemic CD4 or CD8 T cells on ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced inflammation and tumor development. Decreases in systemic CD4 but not CD8 T cells significantly increased and prolonged the acute UVB-induced cutaneous inflammatory response. Increased acute inflammation was associated with significantly increased tumor numbers in CD4-depleted mice chronically exposed to UVB.

Furthermore, topical treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex, a COX-2 inhibitor) significantly decreased tumor numbers in both CD4-replete and CD4-depleted mice. The findings of the study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v127/n6/abs/5700746a.html suggest that CD4 T cells play an important role in modulating both the acute inflammatory and the chronic carcinogenic response of the skin to UVB. Another study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v126/n5/abs/5700191a.html says that increased COX-2 is associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma antiapoptosis (cells that don't die), angiogenesis (new blood vessel growth), and tumorigenesis (tumor development) in humans. (Thank goodness for http://dictionary.reference.com )

The topical use of COX-2 inhibitors such as Celebrex (prescription) and cimetidine (Tagamet, over the counter) seems promising for controlling skin cancer. Does anyone know a good way to make a topical cimetidine solution?
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SoFl

USA
79 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2007 :  10:28:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dan

I found an interesting new study about a certain type of white blood cell called a T-cell (or T-lymphocyte) that plays an important role in the immune system response to skin cancer. There are two main types of T-cells. One type has molecules called CD4 on its surface; these "helper" cells orchestrate the body's response to certain micro-organisms such as viruses. The other T-cells, which have a molecule called CD8, destroy cells that are infected and produce antiviral substances.

The impetus for the study is the fact that solid organ transplant recipients have a 60–250-fold increased likelihood of developing sunlight-induced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared with the general population. This increased risk is linked to the immunosuppressive drugs taken by these patients to modulate T cell function, thus preventing organ rejection.

To determine the importance of T cells in the development of cutaneous (skin) SCC, the study examined the effects of selectively depleting mice of systemic CD4 or CD8 T cells on ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced inflammation and tumor development. Decreases in systemic CD4 but not CD8 T cells significantly increased and prolonged the acute UVB-induced cutaneous inflammatory response. Increased acute inflammation was associated with significantly increased tumor numbers in CD4-depleted mice chronically exposed to UVB.

Furthermore, topical treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex, a COX-2 inhibitor) significantly decreased tumor numbers in both CD4-replete and CD4-depleted mice. The findings of the study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v127/n6/abs/5700746a.html suggest that CD4 T cells play an important role in modulating both the acute inflammatory and the chronic carcinogenic response of the skin to UVB. Another study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v126/n5/abs/5700191a.html says that increased COX-2 is associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma antiapoptosis (cells that don't die), angiogenesis (new blood vessel growth), and tumorigenesis (tumor development) in humans. (Thank goodness for http://dictionary.reference.com )

The topical use of COX-2 inhibitors such as Celebrex (prescription) and cimetidine (Tagamet, over the counter) seems promising for controlling skin cancer. Does anyone know a good way to make a topical cimetidine solution?



I've been doing a lot of research on diet and immune system relative to skin cancer too. I am firmly convinced that the immune system is directly related to skin cancer just because people who are known to be immunosuppressed for various reasons are at much higher risk for skin cancer.

So I think for all of us suffering from skin cancer, boosting the immune system is a top priority.


out of all the things I've tried, here are my top picks.

Vitamin D - proven cancer reducer
Turmeric - Cox 2 inhibitor and has shown to kill cancer in lab tests
CoQ10 - general immune and overall health boost, melanoma patients are known to have low levels of CoQ10
Mushrooms - Chaga, Reishi, Mesima and others immune boosters and cancer fighters
HLA - This makes my skin much more oily and hydrated feeling
Green Tea and I spike it with ECGC powder
Broccomax broccoli concentrate


If anyone has used anything and has definitely noticed improved skin as a result I'd like to know about it !

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April

9 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2015 :  07:30:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SoFl

quote:
Originally posted by dan

I found an interesting new study about a certain type of white blood cell called a T-cell (or T-lymphocyte) that plays an important role in the immune system response to skin cancer. There are two main types of T-cells. One type has molecules called CD4 on its surface; these "helper" cells orchestrate the body's response to certain micro-organisms such as viruses. The other T-cells, which have a molecule called CD8, destroy cells that are infected and produce antiviral substances.

The impetus for the study is the fact that solid organ transplant recipients have a 60–250-fold increased likelihood of developing sunlight-induced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared with the general population. This increased risk is linked to the immunosuppressive drugs taken by these patients to modulate T cell function, thus preventing organ rejection.

To determine the importance of T cells in the development of cutaneous (skin) SCC, the study examined the effects of selectively depleting mice of systemic CD4 or CD8 T cells on ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced inflammation and tumor development. Decreases in systemic CD4 but not CD8 T cells significantly increased and prolonged the acute UVB-induced cutaneous inflammatory response. Increased acute inflammation was associated with significantly increased tumor numbers in CD4-depleted mice chronically exposed to UVB.

Furthermore, topical treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex, a COX-2 inhibitor) significantly decreased tumor numbers in both CD4-replete and CD4-depleted mice. The findings of the study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v127/n6/abs/5700746a.html suggest that CD4 T cells play an important role in modulating both the acute inflammatory and the chronic carcinogenic response of the skin to UVB. Another study at http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v126/n5/abs/5700191a.html says that increased COX-2 is associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma antiapoptosis (cells that don't die), angiogenesis (new blood vessel growth), and tumorigenesis (tumor development) in humans. (Thank goodness for http://dictionary.reference.com )

The topical use of COX-2 inhibitors such as Celebrex (prescription) and cimetidine (Tagamet, over the counter) seems promising for controlling skin cancer. Does anyone know a good way to make a topical cimetidine solution?



I've been doing a lot of research on diet and immune system relative to skin cancer too. I am firmly convinced that the immune system is directly related to skin cancer just because people who are known to be immunosuppressed for various reasons are at much higher risk for skin cancer.

So I think for all of us suffering from skin cancer, boosting the immune system is a top priority.


out of all the things I've tried, here are my top picks.

Vitamin D - proven cancer reducer
Turmeric - Cox 2 inhibitor and has shown to kill cancer in lab tests
CoQ10 - general immune and overall health boost, melanoma patients are known to have low levels of CoQ10
Mushrooms - Chaga, Reishi, Mesima and others immune boosters and cancer fighters
HLA - This makes my skin much more oily and hydrated feeling
Green Tea and I spike it with ECGC powder
Broccomax broccoli concentrate


If anyone has used anything and has definitely noticed improved skin as a result I'd like to know about it !





Are you still taking these? and could you give us an update on if they are helping, etc? Been doing a little research and here is one article on the Broccoli supplement http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Research/Broccoli-supplements-Could-be-better-but-still-effective

Also how much Vitamin D daily?

thanks in advance for your reply and update.
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 01/12/2015 :  22:10:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi April, I think you were asking SoFl but I have been successful with these types of supplements in terms of not having skin cancers for many years after about a 10 year stretch where I did have skin cancers. My strategy was to pile on as many anticancer components that I could find and I guess something eventually worked. In my case, I think skin cancer was especially encouraged by a processed food, high omega 6 oil, and high protein diet more so than excessive sun exposure. Omega 6 oils are immunosuppressive, processed foods are pro-inflammatory, and high protein diets divert pancreatin to digestive tasks instead of cancer control.

I have used most of the items listed above (except HLA) and I still take Vitamin D, Turmeric, and CoQ10 regularly. My current vitamin D dose is 5000IU/ day taken with a meal with fat and a vitamin K2 (Life Extension brand Super K) supplement. Vitamin D is in a balance with and is synergistic with vitamin K, so they need to be taken together. The broccoli supplements probably help and I used to get Broccoli sprouts from the supermarket that were bred to have high sulphurophane content. I'm not sure if they are still available.
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April

9 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2015 :  18:04:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thank for the info on Vitamin D and K connection. How much CoQ10 and Tumeric, and K daily?
Have quit eating red meat, more vegetables, watching fats, gluten, triple strength fish oil from GNC and using sunscreen

Tks,


quote:
Originally posted by dan

Hi April, I think you were asking SoFl but I have been successful with these types of supplements in terms of not having skin cancers for many years after about a 10 year stretch where I did have skin cancers. My strategy was to pile on as many anticancer components that I could find and I guess something eventually worked. In my case, I think skin cancer was especially encouraged by a processed food, high omega 6 oil, and high protein diet more so than excessive sun exposure. Omega 6 oils are immunosuppressive, processed foods are pro-inflammatory, and high protein diets divert pancreatin to digestive tasks instead of cancer control.

I have used most of the items listed above (except HLA) and I still take Vitamin D, Turmeric, and CoQ10 regularly. My current vitamin D dose is 5000IU/ day taken with a meal with fat and a vitamin K2 (Life Extension brand Super K) supplement. Vitamin D is in a balance with and is synergistic with vitamin K, so they need to be taken together. The broccoli supplements probably help and I used to get Broccoli sprouts from the supermarket that were bred to have high sulphurophane content. I'm not sure if they are still available.



Edited by - April on 01/13/2015 18:07:29
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 01/14/2015 :  22:36:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi April, my dosages for CoQ10 are 100mg ubiquinone (supposedly equivalent to 300mg regular CoQ10). For K: 1000mcg K1, 1000mcg K2-m4, & 200mcg K2-m7. I go in spurts on the tumeric and like the Vitacost brand extract with 550mg curcuminoids and black pepper extract for absorption. All these things are fat soluble and need to be taken along with with fat.

Less red meat, more veggies, and less gluten should be good for less cancer. I am not sold on regular use of topical sunscreens and use them only if I am likely to be burned as they prevent vitamin D synthesis in the skin and potentially have hormonal disrupting properties. Sunscreens have not made an apparent positive impact on steadily increasing skin cancer rates since being introduced in the 1930's and combined UVA/UVB products were introduced in 1980. I do take 4mg/day astaxanthin which helps extend sun tolerance by a rough factor of 2 and usually that is enough for me.

Regarding fats, I am persuaded at this point that a low-fat diet is not a good idea. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/05/06/saturated-fat-phobia.aspx http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/07/saturated-fat-cholesterol-heart-disease.aspx What do you think?
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bikermama069

USA
19 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2015 :  15:23:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
this is all very interesting - trying to increase healthy diet and combat skin cancer reoccurrences. thanks for all the info !
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bikermama069

USA
19 Posts

Posted - 04/21/2015 :  01:54:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
just out of curiosity - where does everyone buy their supplements. I have purchased some online and was wondering if there is a better place for quality/price
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Mark100

7 Posts

Posted - 06/18/2015 :  12:30:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have melanoma which unfortunately went into the lymph glands so I will add my two cents worth on this topic

Firstly I went to a cancer clinic in Germany and they did what they call a CD4 CD8 count and I had a count which was similar to an HIV person. Yeah my cd4 count was low and cd8 count was really high so my ratio was very bad. So in my case immune system definitely compromised.

They use all natural methods at the clinic and he put me on mistletoe injections to boost immune function and curcumin. green tea extract and selenium. He also put me on Tagamet aka cimetidine which is mentioned in another thread here. I also take a host of other things including the most important pancreatic digestive enzymes high doses, IP6, Avamer, garlic, high dose vitamin A, probiotics, vit d, quercitin, flaxseed oil,apple cider vinegar.

I eat a high fat diet including eggs, butter, red meat daily, veggie juices, salads ,veggies but no leafy greens or citrus fruit.

Melanoma is a cancer of the immune system and people with melanoma usually have a too alkaline system hence the specific diet. This is based on the work of Dr Kelley and his metabolic cure for cancer.



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trueson

44 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2015 :  21:26:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mark100. Just wondering whether your melanoma is responding, especially to the mistletoe. I tried Mistletoe injections for many months and it seemed to have little to no effect on my BCC or AKs.
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Disclaimer: The three most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. While melanoma is the most dangerous type, keep in mind that any cancer and potentially some cancer treatments can cause injury or death. The various views expressed in these public forums should not be considered as medical advice. See your qualified health-care professional for medical attention, advice, diagnosis, and treatments.