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 Vitamin supplements and skin cancer
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2007 :  01:05:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A new study in the September 2007 Journal of Nutrition found that "Antioxidant Supplementation Increases the Risk of Skin Cancers in Women but Not in Men" http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/137/9/2098
French adults (7876 women and 5141 men) were randomized to take an oral daily capsule of antioxidants (120 mg vitamin C, 30 mg vitamin E, 6 mg -carotene, 100 g selenium, and 20 mg zinc) or a matching placebo. Over 7.5 years, a total of 157 cases of all types of skin cancer were reported, with 25 cases of melanomas.

Here are the findings: In women, the incidence of skin cancer was higher in the antioxidant group [adjusted hazard ratio (adjusted HR) = 1.68; P = 0.03]. Conversely, in men, incidence did not differ between the 2 treatment groups (adjusted HR = 0.69; P = 0.11). Despite the small number of events, the incidence of melanoma was also higher in the antioxidant group for women (adjusted HR = 4.31; P = 0.02). The incidence of nonmelanoma Skin Cancer did not differ between the antioxidant and placebo groups (adjusted HR = 1.37; P = 0.22 for women and adjusted HR = 0.72; P = 0.19 for men).

I think the study headline should have said there was a increase only in melanoma and only in women taking the supplements. Just 1% of the participants had skin cancer over 7.5 years. That also seems abnormally low. Notice the skin cancer hazard ratio was lower for men taking the supplements but not statistically significant (p>0.05)

Anyway, what supplements do you take to prevent skin cancer? I take 2000 IU of vitamin D & folic acid-B12-B6 (reduces sun sensitivity) in the morning and melatonin at night specifically to prevent skin cancer. I would love to hear your thoughts as to the supplements you feel are important to prevent skin cancer.

Mark

36 Posts

Posted - 08/23/2007 :  16:12:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good question Dan. Not much in the way of vitamin supplements for me anymore. To get massive amounts of vitamins, i'm eating lots of raw organic fruit & veggies throughout the day. Lots of berries, oranges, apples, etc. I also include raw wheatgrass (yes I eat raw blades of grass) & apricot pits to add the B17 too. I'm just not too sure about the processes and chemicals, baking, etc that go into creating a vitamin "pill". Also, i'm not too sure that your body can absorb and even USE supplements. Are they even real or synthesized? It just seems eating an organic orange is a better way to add vitamin C. And even though I eat TONS of fruit throughout the day, i've managed to loose a ton of excess weight. Im never hungry, and i have more energy. I've never been able to get that with supplements. I've been pretty sketical even over powdered grass (greens) type drink mixes. How did they powder it? If it was cooked to dry it out, did it kill the enzymes? Does all the fiber remain? My rule of thumb is: If it has to have a nutrition label, I dont eat it.

One other note on taking supplements. Try taking a multi-vitamin pill. You ever notice your urine becomes bright yellow for the next several hours? Why? I can eat 2 apples, 6 strawberries, 2 oranges, etc etc all at once and no bright yellow urine? Sounds stupid, but why wouldn't the same thing happen when you eat fruit equivalent to the amount of vitamins in the pill? There is something else in it in my opinion. Maybe coloring for a marketing scheme to make you "feel" its working by the immediate bright yellow urine? I'm not sure, but I am sure its all about the money.

On that note, because of the cancer, i am supplementing things that are hard to eat that may help. Such as enzymes that are scarce in veggies and fruit. Mainly Pancreatin and CoQ10. I also added a bit of Zinc as a supplement since my diet has almost NO animal meats now. I was taking a Melatonin or two a day, but i have cut back even on that since I found out that walnuts have a ton of melatonin and tons of other good stuf. I sleep like a rock now, so I think its plenty. If i could find natural sources for the enzymes and zinc, i would eat the source. But so far, I dont know how to get the pancreatic enzymes without supplements.

All in all, i've been trying with and without supplements, but the fact is I just dont see or feel any immediate results taking supplements. I've just found that I get more immediate results by choosing foods correctly. My proof is in how much better I feel and how much weight I've lost. I've even noticed that my BCC will tend to get worse right after (and during) weeneds where I "fall off the wagon" even when I was taking supplements.

So there you have it. Eating correctly and excerising seems to rule, at least for me.
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anivoc

639 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2007 :  22:01:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Mark

This will probably be a bit of work but if you are willing, please make a list of your do and don't foods and the fall off the wagon ones you mentioned.. (I assumed a burger or steak)

Thanks,

Tom
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2007 :  12:33:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks like it all depends on the shade of your glasses as to what scientific studies reveal, or perhaps who is paying whom.

A recent study "A Randomized Factorial Trial of Vitamins C and E and Beta Carotene in the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Women" in the August 13, 2007 Archives of Internal Medicine at http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/167/15/1610 states "Conclusion: There were no overall effects of ascorbic acid, vitamin E, or beta carotene on cardiovascular events among women at high risk for CVD." But wait.

"Unraveling the lies about the antioxidant study on vitamins E and C" at http://www.newstarget.com/021974.html has a much different conclusion: The results of the study can be made to look poor by counting the results of all the people who didn't take the vitamins! That is, the results of the vitamin taking group counted those that were instructed to take the vitamins but did not. If you include only the women who complied with taking the vitamins on a regular basis, the results increase substantially and become quite significant with a 31 percent reduction in the risk of stroke and 22 percent reduction of risk in heart attacks. In other words, those women who actually took vitamins E and C experienced substantial benefits from doing so. Those who neglected to take the vitamins, not surprisingly, had little or no benefit. An alternate evaluation of the study can be found at http://www.newstarget.com/021973.html

No wonder we are not getting anywhere with all this "scientific" research.
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anivoc

639 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2007 :  20:16:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan the devil is in the details.
Epistemology..The study of the origin of knowledge and it's validity.

Statistics can be easily manipulated to influence the direction of the desired results. It's all in who, what, when, where and how you ask the question or obtain the data.

Darell Huff's "Lying with Statistics" written in the early 50's is a great resource for understanding how easily we can be misled.

You have to investigate and ask the questions or expect to be misled.
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2007 :  00:10:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another aspect is that the target audience is supposedly internal medicine physicians and most probably don't have time to investigate and ask questions. And we wonder why our health care system is so crappy and expensive at the same time. The fix is more ethics but good luck instilling those in a world that doesn't fear God.

But back to supplements. I think Mark gave a perfect description of what we should do and it's great he is putting it into practice. The lure of weight loss also has some pull. Still, it sometimes seems difficult at least for me to stay on the wagon. One trick I use is to act like a health nut at the grocery store. If you don't buy junk food, chances are greater that you are not going to eat junk food. The two supplements he mentioned, coenzyme Q10 and pancreatin enzymes, are also very good choices for cancer prevention and treatment.
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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2007 :  14:07:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
dan and others.

The supplement and nutrition end of health I have spent innumerable hours on over the course of the last year. I bet I have spent anywhere from 2 to as much as 6 hours A DAY trying to sort through the different supplements, diets, theories , etc.

And....I wasn't looking to buy into any fads or gimmicks, I wanted hard evidence. I read scientific study after study until I would be so overloaded at the end of the day I couldn't even remember my name. I encourage anyone that is serious about nutrition to do some serious investigation.

My basic conclusions are:

Regarding supplements-
-everyone should supplement with omega 3 fatty acids
(search for a list of health issues associated with omega 3 deficiency, among others it includes skin cancer)
-everyone should supplement with a GOOD multivitamin
(our soils are becoming more nutrient deficient through time, even if you eat your fruits and veggies you may not be getting near the nutrition you think you are...especially micronutrients)
-most should supplement with resveratrol

In addition, everyone should assess their own individual cases. What is your age, what is your overall health, what areas of health do you feel could be improved upon...etc. There are other supplements that are proven to aid most issues.

In addition to the above noted items I take CoQ10 (200mg), Vitamin D (1700 mg), green tea extract, vitamin C, turmeric, ginger root and have done a 30 day IP6 routine and will do that again a couple of times a year.

Regarding diet-
there is every conflicting opinion possible regarding what constitutes a healthy diet. But this I can say with a great deal of confidence, The USDA food pyramid is not the best way to eat. I really have enjoyed talking to others about all I have learned about eating....and without going into a lengthy sermon I will just boil it down to what I believe is the essence...

...its very simple. Eat whole foods, and do so in moderation. WOW! What a novel approach, huh? Seriously though, once a person comes to grips with the fact that junk food is bad, as is white bread and other processed starchy foods it becomes self-evident that the western way of eating causes many of our health concerns.

Also, for anyone considering vegetarian diets, or low carb diets, or any other diet of exclusion, I recommend that they check out the book "The Metabolic Typing Diet". To me, this book brings most of what I have read and learned over the years to a conclusion, and that is this.....We are all individual and unique and have different nutritional needs due to our different metabolisms.

How many times have we heard someone swear by a diet, or by a food or supplement as being the best thing ever? We try it and, NOTHING. Why? Because we have a different metabolism, we have different deficencies, etc. That MiracleVita tablet may have cured Aunt Gladys's problem...because she was deficient in something it contained. But for you it does nothing because you are not deficient. But you may need something else......Anyway, this book does a great job of explaining, to me and IMO, why medical studies, or diets, or supplements can many times be contradicting. By the time you get to the end of the book most people will see that they are a mixed-type of metabolism, needing a balnced diet of carbs, fats and protein and wonder if the book was worth it. But if you can grasp the principle that we are each unique in our nutritional needs it is worth the price.

My diet consists of whole foods. I don't eat as many grains as I used to, even whole grains. And yes, I view meat as being essential, in moderation of course. Even fatty meats and cheeses are OK. Leafy green and cruciferous veggies are a big part. Root veggies and corn are NOT. Fruit is only a minor portion... a serving or two a day.

Edited by - rocco on 08/27/2007 14:13:35
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2007 :  08:45:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Rocco! Our combined anticancer supplement list has expanded to:

vitamin D, folic acid-B6-B12, zinc, coenzyme Q10, omega 3 fatty acids, resveratrol, pancreatin enzymes, melatonin, green tea extract, vitamin C, turmeric, ginger root, and IP6 on 30 day cycles.

There is plenty of supporting evidence for all this stuff. I have tried a wide range of supplement types over the years including all these, often taking about 20 different types of pills each day, but I have scaled back lately. Much of the experimenting was part of a search to find an alternative to high blood pressure pills. That was not as successful as I had hoped. I think this is a good list so far but don't expect miracles, I think supplements are better targeted towards cancer prevention. Also, I've been eating ground flax meal in yogurt most every morning for a while now to get omega 3's (part of the Budwig protocol).

Rocco, do you take turmeric pills or something else (same for ginger root)? Many of these supplements on the list could be included in a multivitamin. Anyone, what brand of multivitamin do you take?

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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2007 :  10:56:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
dan,

I also use the ground flax and flax oil on yogurt. I also recommend taking additional fish oil as well. Flax seeds are predominantly short chain n-3's (ALA). Most cold water fish and fish oil supplements are predominantly long chain n-3's (DHA and EPA). EPA and DHA have been studied and shown to be chemopreventive....

""Specifically, omega 3 (3) fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the nomenclature of which was developed at our institute (2), are reportedly chemopreventive ""

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/98/13/7510

....so that is not to say that ALA is not chemopreventive, but, I prefer a full range of n-3's myself for the other benefits as well. Apparently the short n-3's have to be converted inside the body to longer n-3's like EPA and DHA. But, depending on an individual's metabolism and other available nutrients, only about 10% of the ALA will be converted into EPA and DHA.

Here is another interesting papaer on n-3's...

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/84/1/5

The turmeric I take is an extract in capsule form, 1160 mg. It is teamed with biopeperine to make the turmeric more bioavailable. Check out biopeperine some time if you never have. It makes several substances more bioavailable when combined (like quercetin and turmeric). It is the NSI brand from vitacost.

The multivitamin I take is also an NSI brand from vitacost. It is the NSI Synergy Once A Day Multi-Vitamin Version 2. It is available in capsule, or for $2 less a vegetarian version that is identical but in caplet (which is the one I buy). My daughter works in a doctor's office. She took the bottle in for him to look at one day (he's into supplements - not bad for an MD). He sells some very expensive packet-type supplements out of his office. He said he was very impressed with this multivitamin, especially for the price, and was going to switch to these for himself.

One other supplement I failed to mention that I do take is magnesium. I don't know that it has a direct implication to skin cancer, but, several studies show that the majority of Amereicans are magnesium deficient. When I started taking the supplemt I felt an almost immediate, albeit subtle, effect. Magnesium is a anti-contraction element, meaning it relaxes muscles, as oppsed to calcium which is a contraction element. Anyone taking calcium supplements may want to consider balancing the calcium with maybe one half as much magnesium. For me, I drink well water at my home. It is very hard water. I think the magnesium is balancing the calcium that I get from daily water intake.
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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 08/31/2007 :  15:41:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is another positive article regarding EGCG and cancer prevention.

""This suggests that green tea polyphenol intervention may enhance the detoxification of carcinogens in individuals with low baseline detoxification capacity.""

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=17684143&ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

...and here is a bit from a article on selenium.

""We found a statistically significant relationship between colon cancer incidence and soil selenium status across different regions of New Zealand. Additionally, a study of middle-aged men suggested that blood selenium levels lower than 100 ng/ml were inadequate for repair or surveillance of oxidative (and other) DNA damage. We suggest that selenium will be an important antimutagen, at least in New Zealand, possibly through antioxidant effects associated with selenium's role in enzymes associated with endogenous repair of DNA damage. ""

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=15138038&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus

...though the article was written about New Zealand it also applies to much of the US. Many of us are deficient in selenium as well. For what it is worth, the daily multivitamin I recommended in an earlier post contains 200 mcg of selenium, which is a good and adequate quantity for daily supplementation.

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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 09/02/2007 :  18:17:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There really is a ton of evidence to support micronutrient supplementation for cancer and cardiovascular disease prevention. In my case, I felt like it was getting out of hand taking separate supplements. I now feel better about what to do after taking a new look at multivitamins. I am impressed with rocco's choice of multivitamin (NSI Synergy Once A Day Multi-Vitamin Version 2). I found one I liked that I can buy locally, Source Natural's Life Force Multiple Energy Activator without iron (Vitamin Shoppe and online). Every multivitamin is a compromise, this one was short on vitamin D but I was planning to supplement more D separately anyway.

From the tablet construction (soft pressed rather than rock hard), the ingredients included list and amounts (enough but not too much), the forms of the ingredients (natural, absorbable, same kinds found to be effective in studies), one or two tablets a day dosing, and the reputation of the company, there is no comparison to the cheapest brands. The amounts included are not therapeutic doses but it's at least something without going crazy choosing and taking separate supplements. The good multi cleans out the vitamin shelf substantially.

What's left is to eat whole foods in moderation as rocco and Mark suggested and a manageable number of extra supplements: vitamin D, coenzyme Q10, omega 3 fatty acids. Melatonin, resveratrol, pancreatin enzymes, and IP6 are on the optional/ occasional list. Green tea, turmeric (curry), and ginger root, and apple seeds (B17 source) can come from food or supplements. Thanks guys!
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rocco

77 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2007 :  11:39:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a really good article on vitamin D.

Here is a little of it:

"""Concerns about vitamin D toxicity are overblown, along with those about sun exposure. As one researcher in the field puts it, "Worrying about vitamin D toxicity is like worrying about drowning when youre dying of thirst." The LD50 of vitamin D in dogs (the dose that will kill half the animals) is 3,520,000 IU/kilogram. One can take a 10,000 IU vitamin D supplement every day, month after month safely, with no evidence of adverse effect. (Am J Clin Nutr 1999;69:842856). A person must consume 50,000 IU a day for several months before hypercalcemia (an elevated calcium level in the blood, which is the initial manifestation of vitamin D toxicity) might occur. Vitamin D in a physiologic dose (5,000 IU/day) prevents the build up of calcium in blood vessels. (Circulation 1997;96:17551760). If one takes 10,000 IU of vitamin D a day and spends a lot of time in the sun, it would be prudent to check vitamin D blood level to ensure that it does not exceed 100 ng/ml."""
and
"""The rise in skin cancers over the last 25 years parallels the rise in use of sunscreen lotions, which block vitamin D-producing UVB radiation but not cancer-causing ultraviolet A radiation (UVA). (Newer sunscreen lotions also block out UVA.) Each year there are 8,000 deaths from melanoma and 1,500 deaths from nonmelanoma (squamous and basal cell) skin cancer. Surgical excision of nonmelanoma skin cancers cures them, except in rare cases where the growth has been allowed to linger for a long time and metastasize. Dr. John Cannell, Executive Director of the Vitamin D Council, makes this point: 1,500 deaths occur each year from non-melanoma skin cancer, but 1,500 deaths occur each day from other cancers that vitamin D in optimal doses might well prevent."""

http://www.lewrockwell.com/miller/miller25.html
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sebastian348

6 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2008 :  02:38:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I completely agree with rocco that good vitamine supplements should be taken by everyone. Seems like you know a lot about that topic.
I have been taking vitamine supplements for the last couple of years and have been purchasing them from this website http://www.vitaminsupplementer.com/ where you have a huge selection.
Vitamines are really essential to protect yourself against so many illnesses so I think it is important to take supplements as it is not always possible to get everything you need with what you eat.
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jordansem

1 Posts

Posted - 08/16/2008 :  07:23:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cancer is a disease in which the cells(tissue) growth infinitive and the cell takes a abnormal form. Vitamin B12 is often taken as supplement by cancer patients.
New Research has proved that it is possible to take supplements specific to the DNA of the patient. The exact assessment helps in selecting the most appropriate supplement so it gives better results. More about on the matter can be found out at
www.dna-based-supplements.com. The website provides information on DNA wellness.

Edited by - jordansem on 08/16/2008 07:41:44
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james

USA
23 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2008 :  08:40:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan, Rocco, and others. I was just wondering if since you have changed your diets via better food and supplements if you have noticed a decrease in skin cancer on yourselves? I realize it could take time to really notice any differences but I also think that nutrition plays a big role.

Since this is my first post I can introduce myself. I'm 37 and am about to have mohs done to remove a small BCC on my nose. This is my second BCC (the other was on my chest 3 years ago). After getting this second one and having my derm not really give me any answers other than to avoid the sun and expect recurrences I thought I would see if something more could be causing it. That search led me here, then to other various sites like naturalnews.com which is a great site also. I looked at my diet and realized it was bad. I have since switched to a much better multi vitamin (NSI brand listed above, thanks Rocco), am taking a quality fish oil supplement, drink green tea instead of coffee, and am eating many more fruits and veggies each day. I also will mix in a greens powder to make sure I'm getting all the healthy green veggies that I have been lacking for so long. I will probably try the Astaxanthin as well as it seems to help with sunburns and is a super antioxidant.

I believe nutrition played a role in my BCC's but I also had sunburns as a child. Since doing some research I realize I was very vitamin D deficient as well since I've been avoiding much sun contact over the last few years. I'm trying to build up my immune system to fight the free radicals that can cause skin cancer and I have to give a big thanks to Dan for building this site and for others for contributing. Just wondering if others have seen a decrease since improving their nutrition?
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2008 :  01:30:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
james, welcome and thanks for the question! In 2001 I was where you are now in that I had a mhos under my belt and was facing more skin cancer surgery. At the time, the dermatologist told me he thought I could look forward to fairly routine surgeries in the near future. I appreciated his honesty but like you he offered me no answers either other than avoid the sun. I also had lots of sunburns as a child sometimes with huge blisters on my ears and nose.

I haven't seen a dermatologist since 2001 although I get at least yearly checkups to control high blood pressure. So healthwise everything is still not perfect but at least the skin cancer has been kept in check.

Skin cancer prevention measures seem to take a long time to noticeably work. At first it was a scary struggle as I relied mostly on topical and oral enzymes. I later settled in on lifestyle changes such as more fruits and veggies, a Budwig diet breakfast (yogurt with ground flax seed), the daily protein fast, very little junk food, mostly limit eating to meals only, drink lots of green tea and a bit of coffee, limit liquid vegetable oils and trans fats, take a good multi and many other supplements (quercetin, melatonin, resveratrol, coQ10, vitamin C, vitamin D, fish oil). I bought shower and drinking water filters for chlorine. I pretty much eat a normal cafeteria lunch and try to get a bit of sun when I can. I don't know what really works and what doesn't matter but none of these things makes life particularly difficult for me. I have noticed a definite increase in skin health and decrease in suspected skin cancer problems.

I still occasionally use orange oil (d-limonene) topically if I start to worry about a new spot as it is easy to spread on large areas and gives feedback (stinging for 25 minutes) if there is a problem. The orange oil use has been on the decline as well.

I hope this helps and is an encouragement to you. Unfortunately the doctors do not seem to offer much help in skin cancer prevention.
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james

USA
23 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2008 :  07:59:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Dan that is an encouragement. I'm glad you got your problem under control and it looks like good nutrition is a key to all of this. What is the one topical treatment you use when you suspect a spot? I've read a lot about cymilium from people on here and that seems to be a good choice. Do you still use that when you suspect something or do you stick to the orange oil? I'm asking because I think my dietary changes may take a while to really kick in and I don't want to have any more surgeries if I can avoid it. I even suspect that the mohs surgeon will see a couple other small spots when he cuts me open next week. I'm only letting him take care of the one spot though.
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james

USA
23 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2008 :  12:37:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nevermind Dan. I found your page here that explains a lot more: http://www.topicalinfo.org/Topical.htm . Wow, I have been reading the forum a lot but didn't realize how much info the rest of the site has.

Sorry to hijack this thread but after reading the other parts of the site I'm debating on moving my mohs out a couple months and giving cymilium and/or orange oil a shot first. My BCC is quite small but it is on my nose so I'm undecided. I can see other small spots near it that kinda look like BCC as well so I'd rather find something else that works so I don't end up with scars all over my face.

Edited by - james on 12/02/2008 12:38:18
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dan

606 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2008 :  00:59:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
james, hijack away, that's what this is for.

Cymilium http://www.cymilium.com/ is the best topical skin cancer remedy I have tried. It works fast but not too fast and with minimal side effects. The little pouches are convenient. If you can find some good quality pancreatin enzymes such as Source Naturals http://www.vitacost.com/Source-Naturals-Pancreatin-8X it is also easy to make your own cheaper version (household ammonia, aloe vera with urea, pancreatin enzymes) that will work just as well in my opinion. The home mixed version will have a short shelf life so make small batches and store them in a small container such as a contact lens case.

The orange oil http://thatorangestuff.com/index.shtml also works for me and is cheap. But it stings and smells like oranges and there hasn't been much feedback on its use in these forums.
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crogers

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2012 :  09:56:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi - I'm Chris. I am currently looking at having my eigth basal cell removed using Mohs. This is the second on my face. From history, I know this will not stop. I do not want to have any more excisions or surgeries. In researching I found this site. I'm suprised not to see anything posted since 2008. Why is that? More importantly, can any of you tell me if you've used curaderm, black salve or hemp oil to treat your spots? Thanks, Chris
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anivoc

639 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2012 :  15:54:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HI Chris,

Welcome to topicalinfo. There are probably 1000's of post here since 2008, hundreds just from me.. Go Here http://topicalinfo.org/forum/default.asp
to start your journey.

Many topics, many opinions so the phrase do your own due diligence is in full effect.

Dan is the owner of the site and I help moderate ( delete spam and the like ) Dan has come up with a lot of good protocols including vitamin supplements, meat and sugar restricted diet and several topical applications.

Probably the hottest and most well touted recent breakthrough is Petty Spurge, it grows wild all over the world and seems to work pretty darn good. Bloodroot paste is a good alternative but comes with it's own set of drawbacks.

The one thing I do recommend as you go through the threads here is be thorough because unfortunately people come here touting this and that and that it is a super cure only to leave with no proof or evidence. A example is the eggplant and vinegar thread which had all of us rubbing the concoction on our faces ( yes me included) for months turning out to pretty much being a waste of time and energy.

Lastly Curaderm... personally not a fan, a dissatisfied customer. Though they claim almost 100% cure rate IT DID NOT WORK FOR ME and there are several other people here it did not complete the job on. It definitely starts a reaction but it is a long drawn out process unlike bloodroot or Petty spurge and a LOT more expensive. Some of the people who sell it on the net come here and post on occasion, sometimes professionally, sometimes bordering on spam.

Good luck figuring out how you want to proceed and always feel free to ask questions or start a thread of your own.
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crogers

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 08/28/2012 :  17:07:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anivoc - Thanks so much for responding. I've been perusing that site and have seen much of what you mention. So far I find the black salve recommendations most compelling. I haven't seen anything on petty surge but will continue to look. What can you tell me or point me to regarding Orange or citrus oil? See a lot of talk about that too. Thank you for you objectiveness and canded description of your personal experience. I appreciate it. Once decided upon a tropical treatment, do you recommend any particular avenue for purchasing authentic products? Lastly do you know if folks on this forum typically work with a nuturepath or homeopathic clinician during treatment? Living in the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill region of NC, I thought I could easily find such practices to help me seek out alternative treatments but I am having a lot of difficulty finding anything at all. Any advice or direction to offer? Thanks, Chris
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anivoc

639 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2012 :  13:26:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris you have the opportunity to really learn a lot here..I think more people do this on their own than use a naturapath but some here have with success..Definitely like finding a good auto mechanic..some are way better than others and some are just in it for seeing how much money they can milk you for.

Hopefully Dan will chime in here he is a lot more experienced with the orange oil than I.

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Disclaimer: The three most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. While melanoma is the most dangerous type, keep in mind that any cancer and potentially some cancer treatments can cause injury or death. The various views expressed in these public forums should not be considered as medical advice. See your qualified health-care professional for medical attention, advice, diagnosis, and treatments.