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 Topical ibuprofen (liquid Advil) for skin cancer

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dan Posted - 03/19/2007 : 22:08:43
Another easy to try potential skin cancer growth inhibitor to consider is topical ibuprofen (Advil). Simply combine the contents from a liquid Advil or liquid generic ibuprofen capsule with a skin cream (Vasoline Intensive Care, Jergen's, etc) Don't apply the liquid ibuprofen directly to the skin without mixing with a skin cream because it is too strong and acidic. Ibuprophen works by inhibiting the COX-2 enzyme that cancer cells need. A single application of topical ibuprofen can remain in the skin for days so there is no need reapply frequently.
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dan Posted - 06/07/2007 : 22:41:14
Grouppe Kurosawa has a informative writeup on topical ibuprofen at http://painrelief.grouppekurosawa.com Although they have been advocating the use of topical ibuprophen for years on cancers, it is NOT advised in their latest cancer protocol at http://cancerprotocol.grouppekurosawa.com

For pain relief, topical ibuprofen still sounds like a good plan. They also mention combining with DMSO or orange oil to increase the penetration into the skin as grabec has suggested.

Despite the change from the Grouppe Kurosawa group, topical ibuprofen does some good things for controlling skin cancer growth by inhibiting the COX-2 enzyme and also NF-kappaB that promotes the survival of cancer cells. So who knows, it might still be worthwhile topically for skin cancer. At the very least it should control the growth of skin cancer for a while.

Cimetidine, also known as Tagamet, is a potential topical ingredient for skin cancer that is in the Grouppe Kurosawa protocol. A simple way to apply it topically is to chew the tablets but not swallow. One could then spit them into a skin lotion and apply. Cimetidine does many of the same good things as ibuprofen such as inhibit the COX-2 enzyme and it also increases special white blood cells called CD4 T-cells that appear to be instrumental to a good immune system response to skin cancer.

Although cancer cells can be killed by strong acids it would be at a pH level that also harms normal cells.
grabec Posted - 06/02/2007 : 18:45:15
This is a very interesting post. You mentioned to mix the ibuprofen with something because of it being too acidic-is that not bad for a cancer? But, if not could you mix it with aloe vera to keep it from being too acidic? Or, how about mixing it with DMSO as I read on this website that that is a good carrier to take the ibuprofen deeper into one's system. Just thinking outloud. I have always wanted to know some way to apply ibuprofen topically for a headache or something as it is so hard on my stomach. thanks for the info.

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